Loading... Please wait...
  • Image 1

A Cafe in Space, Volume 12

$14.99
Weight:
10.00 Ounces
Rating:
Shipping:
Calculated at checkout
Quantity:

Product Description

Volume 12 of A Café in Space features excerpts from Anais Nin's unpublished diary revealing the truth about the famous "come as your madness" party in 1953, at which Nin's daring costume caused a sensation and where Kenneth Anger got inspiration for his underground classic film "Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome." Previously unpublished photos accompany Nin's commentary. In her article, "Political Nin," Kim Krizan unearths previously unknown letters by Nin about JFK's assassination which prove she was not, as some critics charge, an insular, self-obsessed narcissist who didn't care about the outside world. In 1934, Nin had her first (and by now most discussed) abortion, the trauma of which forever changed her life and how she wrote. Katja Holmes examines how Nin turned the trauma into not only literature, but a life philosophy--the birth of the artist. Volume 12 also contains scholars' examinations of Nin' fiction, her sexual awakening, the French village where her legendary house dubbed "the laboratory of the soul" was located, poetry, art, and book reviews of a new Miller biography and a new book on the Beats by John Tytell.

Release date is end of Feb. 2015.

Find Similar Products by Category

Product Reviews

Write your own product review

  1. The Trapeze Artist Continues to Attract Readers 5 Star Review

    Posted by on 30th Mar 2015

    The first three contributions in this volume are stunning: Nin's ruminations on the JFK assassination, an excerpt Nin's soon-to-be-published, unexpurgated diary entitled "Trapeze" -- about what really happened at the Come As Your Madness party Nin wrote about in her earlier writings, and Paul Herron's well-done exposition of the convoluted history of publication regarding Nin's "Spy in the House of Love."

    Another enjoyment is Simon Boucheraud's exploration of Nin's views of the Mediterranean between 1914 and 1939. Nin's ability to describe her travel experiences is well-conveyed here. Katja Holmes's views of creation versus procreation in "Birth of an Artist" contain some observations for thoughtful ruminations about Nin's esthetics and ethics.

    Lastly, the excerpt from Sophie Taam's new biography of Anais Nin, currently available only in French, and addressing the topic of the men in Nin's early life allows the reader to see Nin in a new way and is worthy of the reader's attention.

    There are poems here and well-written book reviews at the back of the volume that may arouse the interest of readers in the Beat Movement or the life of Henry Miller.

    This is a sound volume of literary exploration into Nin's world and writings, and it's amazing that the editor Paul Herron admirably continues to find new pathways towards Anais Nin's oeuvre that continue to refresh and renew interest in Anais Nin.


  2. More Insights and More Delights 5 Star Review

    Posted by on 30th Mar 2015

    The first three contributions in this volume are stunning: Nin's ruminations on the JFK assassination, an excerpt Nin's soon-to-be-published, unexpurgated diary entitled "Trapeze" -- about what really happened at the Come As Your Madness party Nin wrote about in her earlier writings, and Paul Herron's well-done exposition of the convoluted history of publication regarding Nin's "Spy in the House of Love."

    Another enjoyment is Simon Boucheraud's exploration of Nin's views of the Mediterranean between 1914 and 1939. Nin's ability to describe her travel experiences are well-conveyed here. Katja Holmes's views of creation versus procreation in "Birth of an Artist" contains some observations for thoughtful ruminations about Nin's esthetics and ethics.

    Lastly, the excerpt from Sophie Taam's new biography of Anais Nin, currently available only in French, and addressing the topic of the men in Nin's early life allows the reader to see Nin in a new way and is worthy of the reader's attention.

    There are poems here and well-written book reviews at the back of the volume that may arouse the interest of readers in the Beat Movement or the life of Henry Miller.

    This is a sound volume of literary exploration into Nin's world and writings, and it's amazing that the editor Paul Herron admirably continues to find new pathways towards Anais Nin's oeuvre that continue to refresh and renew interest in Anais Nin.





Sign up to our newsletter


Connect with us: Twitter